STREET PHOTOGRAPHER

Let me tell you a story.

Before I was a street photographer I shot parties in Toronto. During those events, I’d often sit on a stack of speakers to reload film, have a drink, or smoke. I’m not a smiler. My normal face is rather deadpan and solemn. I can’t tell you how many times some kid would come up to me and say “DUDE! WHY SO GLUM? YOU OKAY?” To them I looked sad, but inside I was having a perfectly amazing time. Now let’s say one of them snapped a shot of me and posted it with the title “sadness surrounded by happiness” or some bullshit like that? Is that photograph better? In my opinion, as soon as the photographer wrote that lie to accompany the picture, the picture lost something. Street Photographers who write about their photos like painters white about their paintings annoy me.


From this interview.

street photographer: Dayv Mattt

Street Photographer?

There is this mentality today that something profound needs to accompany the shot. It is infuriating that so many great photos out there include text that tells lies, exaggerations, and half-truths the street photographer comes up with in the hope that their words will resonate with critics, editors, and curators, and worst of all, make their photo more compelling. Making a joke or sometimes writing something is fine, but there are photographers out there neck deep in that fucking nonsense.

From this interview.

street photographer: Dayv Mattt

I shot because it was fun. I didn’t make many prints, and I didn’t show very many people my work. I just did it because I liked shooting at parties. I loved Jungle, but I didn’t dance and I didn’t really have a big posse of friends who liked Jungle enough to go to parties. The camera gave me a reason to be there.

From this interview.

street photographer: Dayv Mattt